/page/2
life:

Hopper (lying on sofa) and Adams listen intently as Wood reads aloud from Thomas Wolfe’s The Hills Beyond in 1956. “Natalie does the majority of the reading at these soirees, but they take turns,” LIFE’s reporter wrote in notes discovered in the magazine’s archives. “Natalie says she has read every word Wolfe has ever written. They also read plays, by such authors as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Sidney Kingsley, Carson McCullers. Natalie’s favorite book is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.”
Happy Birthday, Natalie Wood.

life:

Hopper (lying on sofa) and Adams listen intently as Wood reads aloud from Thomas Wolfe’s The Hills Beyond in 1956. “Natalie does the majority of the reading at these soirees, but they take turns,” LIFE’s reporter wrote in notes discovered in the magazine’s archives. “Natalie says she has read every word Wolfe has ever written. They also read plays, by such authors as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Sidney Kingsley, Carson McCullers. Natalie’s favorite book is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.”

Happy Birthday, Natalie Wood.

teachingliteracy:

reginasworld:

Recently The Gordon Parks Foundation discovered over 70 unpublished photographs by Parks at the bottom of an old storage box wrapped in paper and marked as “Segregation Series.” These never before series of images not only give us a glimpse into the everyday life of African Americans during the 50′s but are also in full color, something that is uncommon for photographs from that era.

(via nestingangels)

crucium:

Early Morning Fog (by Dan Sherman)

crucium:

Early Morning Fog (by Dan Sherman)

(via walls-of-grey)

I’ve been told
that people in the army
do more by 7:00 am
than I do
in an entire day

but if I wake
at 6:59 am
and turn to you
to trace the outline of your lips
with mine
I will have done enough
and killed no one
in the process.

– “6:59 AM” by Shane Koyczan (via atomiclanterns)

(Source: contramonte)

thedessygroup:

Tender Day After: Sharing a beer, sidewalk conversation & my favorite dress EVER
Full Post here: www.bridesmaid.com

thedessygroup:

Tender Day After: Sharing a beer, sidewalk conversation & my favorite dress EVER

Full Post here: www.bridesmaid.com

lizhasthoughts:

fishingboatproceeds:

lexcanroar:

I am a fan of this

Worth remembering every single time you make a purchase.

oooh, like

lizhasthoughts:

fishingboatproceeds:

lexcanroar:

I am a fan of this

Worth remembering every single time you make a purchase.

oooh, like

(Source: elgrimorio1113)

patrickharris:

Autistic artist Stephen Wiltshire draws spellbinding 18ft picture of New York from memory… after a 20-minute helicopter ride over city

Read more

(via nestingangels)

futurejournalismproject:

Photographs That Change Society
Light Stalking looks at seven iconic photographs and how they changed perceptions of events that most had only read about, if they had heard anything about a particular issue at all.
For example, in this 1980 photograph by Mike Wells a foreign missionary in Uganda holds the hand of a starving boy. A massive famine at the time killed 21% of the population including 60% of all infants. 
Wells’ photograph later became the 1980 World Press Photo of the Year and brought famine into public consciousness. Simply, photographs like these — and the additional coverage they prompted — inspired people to act to end an ongoing tragedy.
Light Stalking: 7 Photographs That Show Society’s Debt to Photography.

futurejournalismproject:

Photographs That Change Society

Light Stalking looks at seven iconic photographs and how they changed perceptions of events that most had only read about, if they had heard anything about a particular issue at all.

For example, in this 1980 photograph by Mike Wells a foreign missionary in Uganda holds the hand of a starving boy. A massive famine at the time killed 21% of the population including 60% of all infants. 

Wells’ photograph later became the 1980 World Press Photo of the Year and brought famine into public consciousness. Simply, photographs like these — and the additional coverage they prompted — inspired people to act to end an ongoing tragedy.

Light Stalking: 7 Photographs That Show Society’s Debt to Photography.

(via fotojournalismus)

life:

Hopper (lying on sofa) and Adams listen intently as Wood reads aloud from Thomas Wolfe’s The Hills Beyond in 1956. “Natalie does the majority of the reading at these soirees, but they take turns,” LIFE’s reporter wrote in notes discovered in the magazine’s archives. “Natalie says she has read every word Wolfe has ever written. They also read plays, by such authors as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Sidney Kingsley, Carson McCullers. Natalie’s favorite book is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.”
Happy Birthday, Natalie Wood.

life:

Hopper (lying on sofa) and Adams listen intently as Wood reads aloud from Thomas Wolfe’s The Hills Beyond in 1956. “Natalie does the majority of the reading at these soirees, but they take turns,” LIFE’s reporter wrote in notes discovered in the magazine’s archives. “Natalie says she has read every word Wolfe has ever written. They also read plays, by such authors as Tennessee Williams, Arthur Miller, Sidney Kingsley, Carson McCullers. Natalie’s favorite book is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupery.”

Happy Birthday, Natalie Wood.

teachingliteracy:

reginasworld:

Recently The Gordon Parks Foundation discovered over 70 unpublished photographs by Parks at the bottom of an old storage box wrapped in paper and marked as “Segregation Series.” These never before series of images not only give us a glimpse into the everyday life of African Americans during the 50′s but are also in full color, something that is uncommon for photographs from that era.

(via nestingangels)

crucium:

Early Morning Fog (by Dan Sherman)

crucium:

Early Morning Fog (by Dan Sherman)

(via walls-of-grey)

darkcontent:

292/365 (by kelly.marie)

darkcontent:

292/365 (by kelly.marie)

I’ve been told
that people in the army
do more by 7:00 am
than I do
in an entire day

but if I wake
at 6:59 am
and turn to you
to trace the outline of your lips
with mine
I will have done enough
and killed no one
in the process.

– “6:59 AM” by Shane Koyczan (via atomiclanterns)

(Source: contramonte)

thedessygroup:

Tender Day After: Sharing a beer, sidewalk conversation & my favorite dress EVER
Full Post here: www.bridesmaid.com

thedessygroup:

Tender Day After: Sharing a beer, sidewalk conversation & my favorite dress EVER

Full Post here: www.bridesmaid.com

breakingmamasrules:

Hear my soul. 

breakingmamasrules:

Hear my soul. 

lizhasthoughts:

fishingboatproceeds:

lexcanroar:

I am a fan of this

Worth remembering every single time you make a purchase.

oooh, like

lizhasthoughts:

fishingboatproceeds:

lexcanroar:

I am a fan of this

Worth remembering every single time you make a purchase.

oooh, like

(Source: elgrimorio1113)

patrickharris:

Autistic artist Stephen Wiltshire draws spellbinding 18ft picture of New York from memory… after a 20-minute helicopter ride over city

Read more

(via nestingangels)

futurejournalismproject:

Photographs That Change Society
Light Stalking looks at seven iconic photographs and how they changed perceptions of events that most had only read about, if they had heard anything about a particular issue at all.
For example, in this 1980 photograph by Mike Wells a foreign missionary in Uganda holds the hand of a starving boy. A massive famine at the time killed 21% of the population including 60% of all infants. 
Wells’ photograph later became the 1980 World Press Photo of the Year and brought famine into public consciousness. Simply, photographs like these — and the additional coverage they prompted — inspired people to act to end an ongoing tragedy.
Light Stalking: 7 Photographs That Show Society’s Debt to Photography.

futurejournalismproject:

Photographs That Change Society

Light Stalking looks at seven iconic photographs and how they changed perceptions of events that most had only read about, if they had heard anything about a particular issue at all.

For example, in this 1980 photograph by Mike Wells a foreign missionary in Uganda holds the hand of a starving boy. A massive famine at the time killed 21% of the population including 60% of all infants. 

Wells’ photograph later became the 1980 World Press Photo of the Year and brought famine into public consciousness. Simply, photographs like these — and the additional coverage they prompted — inspired people to act to end an ongoing tragedy.

Light Stalking: 7 Photographs That Show Society’s Debt to Photography.

(via fotojournalismus)

"

I’ve been told
that people in the army
do more by 7:00 am
than I do
in an entire day

but if I wake
at 6:59 am
and turn to you
to trace the outline of your lips
with mine
I will have done enough
and killed no one
in the process.

"

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